A break

After some 15 years of active blogging – about 10 years of which has taken place on this site & domain – I have decided to take a bit of a break from blogging. You’ll see from the date of the previous post that the break already started a while back.

This is not because I’d have a lack of ideas on what to write about, quite the contrary. What I am lacking is time – or rather, I choose to temporarily prioritize the time I have away from this blog. This is a result of a number of factors, ranging from an ongoing professional detour into the world of corporate sustainability to a personal one of decisively setting roots in Melbourne in the form of building a house. I reckon those alone will keep me relatively busy for some time, and I hope to share results of the latter project later on (maybe even revive the blog into a construction blog for 2014).

Other factors are involved, too – like the dilemma many bloggers are familiar with: after a break that extends for a longer period of time (in this case due to spending a good chunk of the European summer in Europe), the perceived pressure increases to write something really good next time, which inevitably takes longer, which in turn increases the imagined pressure, which … you get the drift. Other forms of communication – like alternative channels for professional communication and Twitter for casual commentary – also tend to encroach on blogging. I will not, however, go as far as some commentators have in saying that blogging would be dead. I don’t believe that is the case, or would be the case for a very long time to come.

But clearly since I don’t have anything better to say, I should wrap up. So, see you later. I’ll leave you with some food for thought from Immoderate Greatness:

The real concern for a civilization dependant on fossil fuels is not really the moment in time when the maximum rate of petroleum extraction is reached, after which production enters terminal decline, but rather the inexorable trend toward lower net energy and higher costs, both monetary and environmental.
[…]
It is vital to understand that technology is not a source of energy. […] Technology and good management can forestall the day of ecological reckoning, but not indefinitely.
[…]
Finally, however, resources are either effectively exhausted or no longer repay the effort needed to exploit them. As massive demand collides with dwindling supply, ecological credit that has fueled expansion and created a large population accustomed to living high off the hog is choked off. The civilization begins to implode, in either a slow and measured decline or a more rapid and chaotic collapse.

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One Response to A break

  1. Markus Boehm says:

    Hi Sami, we met/cooperated in RESTful SDF project. We initiated the project, then I was the project lead at CTO innovations in Munich. I’m looking for a job in Australia for 1+ years. Could You offer me any advice resp. point to some opportunities? Of course I’d be happy to send you more details (like CV) on Your request. BR Markus Boehm

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